spaghettification or nah?

Talk Physics or Talk Shit.
Aspiring Physicist.
Often speaks on shitty science and wastes time.

xoblazinblasian:

chasingthathigh:

Beyonce - Mine feat. Drake - Kaelynn KK Harris - Choreography

She did that!!!!

This made me really happy, I love people actually enjoying what they do

(via lilmexicolil)

Nelly

—Grillz

00sjams:

Grillz | Nelly (Paul Wall and Ali & Gipp)

sagansense:

With all the hype surrounding the untapped abounding resources of cannabis - medicinally, agriculturally, or otherwise undetermined knowns as of yet - the pictures above provide you with a glimpse into the beauty of the plant, unfettered from government or political divides or opinion.

Sativa and Indica strains of cannabis get their close up through a scanning electron microscope in Ford McCann’s book “Cannabis Under The Microscope: A Visual Exploration of Medicinal Sativa and C. Indica.

Source reference: LeafScience

Want more SEM photography? Wander over to Rose-Lynn Fisher’s site and indulge in her gorgeous book’s ‘BEE’ and ‘The Topography of Tears’

(via mindblowingscience)

ryanugenthopkins:

no…more.„….dumb…….white….girls……….in…butchered….„,..mixes….of…..traditional……Indian……..„clothing……….please……

(via vincecarters)

northmiamigoon:

if u think just bc we live in the same house I won’t beat yo ass the image you have of this world was taken by a flip phone

(via foolsxgoldx)

ancientpeoples:

Stone panel from the North-West Palace of Ashurnasirpal II (Court D, no. 7)
Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern IraqNeo-Assyrian
c. 883-859 BC
This relief panel comes from the walls of the courtyard which led to the throne room of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). It was positioned next to a side-door through which his throne was sometimes visible.
Although many of the sculptures decorating the palace depicted magical spirits, away from the main central door and buttresses the scenes in the courtyard were secular. This scene was part of series showing a group of foreigners bringing tribute. Their dress shows that they were from the west. The turban suggests one man is from north-western Syria, his clenched fists are a token of submission. At this time Assyria was expanding westward to acquired booty and tribute from states in the geographical region of Syria. The man with monkeys may be Phoenician. They bring luxury goods and status symbols. The monkeys may have come from Egypt or from the lands of southern Arabia from which incense was imported.
Mesopotamian kings prided themselves in the collections of exotic animals they acquired as booty or tribute. Monkeys were popular animals in the art of Mesopotamia. They were often depicted playing musical instruments, perhaps representing animals accompanying travelling entertainers. 
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

Stone panel from the North-West Palace of Ashurnasirpal II (Court D, no. 7)

Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern Iraq
Neo-Assyrian

c. 883-859 BC

This relief panel comes from the walls of the courtyard which led to the throne room of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). It was positioned next to a side-door through which his throne was sometimes visible.

Although many of the sculptures decorating the palace depicted magical spirits, away from the main central door and buttresses the scenes in the courtyard were secular. This scene was part of series showing a group of foreigners bringing tribute. Their dress shows that they were from the west. The turban suggests one man is from north-western Syria, his clenched fists are a token of submission. At this time Assyria was expanding westward to acquired booty and tribute from states in the geographical region of Syria. The man with monkeys may be Phoenician. They bring luxury goods and status symbols. The monkeys may have come from Egypt or from the lands of southern Arabia from which incense was imported.

Mesopotamian kings prided themselves in the collections of exotic animals they acquired as booty or tribute. Monkeys were popular animals in the art of Mesopotamia. They were often depicted playing musical instruments, perhaps representing animals accompanying travelling entertainers. 

Source: British Museum

Teedra Moses

—Be Your Girl

00sjams:

Be Your Girl | Teedra Moses

artandsciencejournal:

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch